Chicano tattoos

The term ‘Chicano’ became famous during the 1960s and 1970s among the Mexican Americans. It is a term used to denote the Mexicans who grew up in the United States. The Chicano tattoo style was formed and developed in the Latin neighborhoods’ and Hispanic prison gangs of USA.

The Chicano tattoos are similar to biker tattoos in style and method, but have a totally different social relevance. These tattoos originated in poverty stricken areas and harsh prison conditions. They denote a very rough, crude and strong imagery. Since the inception was under such tough conditions, these tattoos were initially done by hand with a needle dipped in various shades of black ink. Common images used in the Chicano tattoo style were portrayals of gang and family life – of loved ones (women), religion (Christ, the Virgin of Guadeloupe), ancestral lineage and gang affiliations.

One of the most common Chicano tattoos is a small Pachuco cross drawn between the thumb and forefinger to denote gang membership. Although it started as a monochrome, tattoo artists have started using colors to add visual delight to the Chicano tattoo and bring it out of the genre of gangs, thus making it more popular with all tattoo lovers.

Image Courtesy Waktattoos

The term ‘Chicano’ became famous during the 1960s and 1970s among the Mexican Americans. It is a term used to denote the Mexicans who grew up in the United States. The Chicano tattoo style was formed and developed in the Latin neighborhoods’ and Hispanic prison gangs of USA.

Chicano tattoos

The Chicano tattoos are similar to biker tattoos in style and method, but have a totally different social relevance. These tattoos originated in poverty stricken areas and harsh prison conditions. They denote a very rough, crude and strong imagery. Since the inception was under such tough conditions, these tattoos were initially done by hand with a needle dipped in various shades of black ink. Common images used in the Chicano tattoo style were portrayals of gang and family life – of loved ones (women), religion (Christ, the Virgin of Guadeloupe), ancestral lineage and gang affiliations.

One of the most common Chicano tattoos is a small Pachuco cross drawn between the thumb and forefinger to denote gang membership. Although it started as a monochrome, tattoo artists have started using colors to add visual delight to the Chicano tattoo and bring it out of the genre of gangs, thus making it more popular with all tattoo lovers.

Image Courtesy Waktattoos

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